LASU Law Students Outshine Indian Counterparts



The faculty of law, Lagos State University (LASU), excelled in India, outwitting the host of the 8th edition of the Gujarat National Law University International Moot Court Competition on international trade law (GIMC) 2016.

 The LASU team comprising Michael Babalola, Taiwo Okuneye, Mabawonku Olanrewaju, who are all graduating students of the university, and Rufus Olaoluwa, head of the department jurisprudence and international law, defeated the host at the second round of the competition.

Speaking to TheCable, Babalola said it was a great feeling of success to have defeated a law-focused university, revered by its neighbours.

 “It was a great feeling of success because neighbouring universities had talked about the expertise of the school, bearing in mind the specialization of the college in law, which is evident in their laurels arcade situated at the schools administrative building,” he said.

 GIMC is India’s only moot court competition based on international trade law and LASU was the only university from Nigeria and Africa to have graced the contest.
Group photo of all participants at the 8th edition of the  Gujarat National Law University International Moot Court Competition on International trade law 2016.

Group photo of all participants at the 8th edition of the Gujarat National Law University International Moot Court Competition on International trade law 2016 Group photo of all participants at the Competition

 The moot court competition is recognized by various international organizations such as the American Society of International Law (ASIL), the International Law Students Association (ILSA), the Asian Society of International Law (Asian SIL) and the World Trade Institute (WTI).
Image result for lasu law students defeat indian

This year’s edition of the moot dealt with issues of “domestic content requirements, interference in the use of trademarks and imposition of other barriers to trade”.

 The LASU team did not make it to the finals of the competition but conceded the competition in the spirit of sportsmanship. “My team members and I felt denied of our right to the finals. However, in the spirit of sportsmanship, we were happy with the judges’ comments of ‘our excellent advocacy skills,’” Babalola said.

 “Having had one of the highest marks at the preliminary stage and the good impression and comments, participants from other regions had of us, towards having a positive mindset about what Nigeria, Africa could offer in terms of Legal research and advocacy.”

 There were 42 participating teams from the US, Australia, Indonesia, India, Sri-lanka, Nepal and other countries across the world.

Source: TheCable

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